New York Rocker


New York Rocker published 54 issues between 1976 and 1982. They had a small staff, no more than a half-dozen full-time at most. The peak of its circulation was around 35,000 copies a month. But as they say, it was incredibly influential. And more than being influential, it was just a great paper. And it still is, if you can find the back issues. The writing is excellent, the tone is smart and punchy, and it’s also deadly serious. They covered national stuff really well but also managed to stay really hyper-local. Especially as the paper went on, its correspondents weren’t just fans active in their own cities and scenes, but also fans of a truly remarkable breed. In one issue, there’s a photo of a Sex Pistols gig, and the photo credit is ‘Steven Morrissey,’ who ran the band’s fan club. Another issue has scene reports from Cleveland credited to James Jarmusch. In 1981, they gave R.E.M. their first national press which allowed the band to trademark its name. Time and time again, they were on top of things, in a totally sincere, uncynical, and self-aware way. They charted what’s now blurrily called American indie rock, but they also had a pretty major hand in inventing it. It’s a really dated name now, New York Rocker. …”
PERFECT SOUND FOREVER
NY Rocker
New York Rocker: The Covers (1976 – 1982)
W – New York Rocker
amazon: New York Rocker

RE/Search Publications


RE/Search Publications is an American magazine and book publisher, based in San Francisco, founded by its editor V. Vale in 1980. In a few references Andrea Juno was also credited as an editor. However it was the successor to Vale’s earlier punk rock fanzine Search & Destroy (1977–1979), which was started with $200 provided to Vale by Allen Ginsberg and Lawrence Ferlinghetti. RE/Search itself began as a tabloid-sized magazine. The debut issue of Search & Destroy (1977), named after the Stooges song, focused on the emerging punk and new wave scene, with articles on Mabuhay Gardens, the hottest venue for punk in the city, and interviews with the local bands Crime, Vermilion, and the Nuns. The first issue of RE/Search (1980) had photographs by Ruby Ray and articles on Factrix, The Slits, conspiracies (written by Jay Kinney), Young Marble Giants, Boyd Rice‘s NON, Cabaret Voltaire, Sun Ra, flashcards, Japan, J. G. Ballard, Julio Cortázar, rhythm & noise, Soldier of Fortune Magazine, Throbbing Gristle, nuclear disaster, Situationism, Octavio Paz, and ‘punk prostitutes’. It was distributed by Rough Trade. Following the third issue, issues 4 and 5 were collected as a single volume, a ‘special book issue’. Subsequent issues all retained the book format. …”
Wikipedia
RE/Search: List of publications

Punk


Punk was a music magazine and fanzine created by cartoonist John Holmstrom, publisher Ged Dunn, and ‘resident punk’ Legs McNeil in 1975. Its use of the term “punk rock“, coined by writers for Creem magazine a few years earlier, further popularized the term. The founders were influenced by their affection for comic books and the music of The Stooges, the New York Dolls, and The Dictators. Holmstrom later called it ‘the print version of The Ramones’. It was also the first publication to popularize the CBGB scene. Punk published 15 issues between 1976 and 1979, as well as a special issue in 1981 (The D.O.A. Filmbook), and several more issues in the new millennium. Its covers featured Sex Pistols, Iggy Pop, Lou Reed, Patti Smith, and Blondie. Punk was a vehicle for examining the underground music scene in New York, and primarily for punk rock as found in clubs like CBGB, Zeppz, and Max’s Kansas City. …”
Wikipedia
Punk magazine’s John Holmstrom
Punk Magazine
Punk’d: The Seminal Downtown Zine of the ’70s Celebrates an Anniversary
amazon
YouTube: Flashez: Punk Magazine Interview (1977)

Sniffin’ Glue


Sniffin’ Glue and Other Rock ‘N’ Roll Habits…, widely known as simply Sniffin’ Glue, was a monthly punk zine started by Mark Perry in July 1976 and released for about a year. The name is derived from a Ramones song ‘Now I Wanna Sniff Some Glue.’ Others that wrote for the magazine that later became well known journalists include Danny Baker. Although initial issues only sold 50 copies, circulation soon increased to 15,000. The innovative appeal of Sniffin’ Glue was its immediacy. ‘Sniffin’ Glue was not so much badly written as barely written; grammar was non-existent, layout was haphazard, headlines were usually just written in felt tip, swearwords were often used in lieu of a reasoned argument. . .all of which gave Sniffin’ Glue its urgency and relevance.’ The early days of the punk movement largely failed to attract the attention of television or the mainstream press, and Sniffin’ Glue was a key source of photographs of, and information about, contributors to the scene. NME acclaimed Sniffin’ Glue as ‘the nastiest, healthiest and funniest piece of press in the history of rock’n’roll habits’ and it became a chronicle of the early days of British punk rock as well as pioneering the DIY punk ethic. For the final issue Mark’s sidekick Sniffin’ Glue photographer, business affairs and later band manager Harry Murlowski recorded ‘Love Lies Limp’ released as a flexi disc record – the first release from Mark Perry’s band Alternative TV. Fearing absorption into the mainstream music press, Perry ceased publication in 1977. In the last issues he encouraged his readers to follow him with their own punk fanzines. Sniffin’ Glue is often incorrectly credited as the source of the illustration featuring drawings of three guitar chord shapes, captioned, ‘this is a chord, this is another, this is a third. Now form a band’, this drawing actually originally appeared in January 1977 in another fanzine Sideburns and was later reproduced in The Stranglers‘ fanzine Strangled. …”
Wikipedia
Independent – Sniffin’ Glue: A fanzine that epitomized punk
Sniffin’ Glue: The definitive first wave U.K. punk zine
Tracing the beginnings of the punk fanzine
‘Sniffin’ Glue’: First Whiff Of Punk’s Ultimate Fanzine
Subway Sect Interview in Sniffin Glue from November 1976